What is it?

This is a simple information exchange for beginner level learners. Because the exchange includes ample visual aides (pictures), the cognitive demand is easier for the language learner and anxiety about taking part in an online exchange may be lessened.


Paired classes in different countries ‘ depict’ objects in their classrooms through the use of pictures and simple descriptions. The photos and ‘ clues’ go from abstract to more specific. The other class has to guess what the object is. Target language use depends on the language level but can range from simple descriptions (e.g. It is usually in the corner) to passive voice (e.g. It is used for … ). Question and short answers are also targeted (e.g. Is it … ?, Yes, it is, no it isn’ t). Specific vocabulary is also used (e.g. colors, classroom lexicon).

Action Required!

This task is part of a larger task sequence aimed at exploring cross-disciplinary subjects of social sciences, language and intercultural awareness.


In this activity, students are expected to not only demonstrate that they have assimilated new knowledge, they are asked ‘ to do something with it’ . Working in virtual teams, the students are responsible for creating a plan of action that addresses a social and/or cultural issue.

What’s in a fairy tale?

This task is part of a larger task sequence aimed at exploring cross-disciplinary subjects of social sciences, language and intercultural awareness.


Students are given different texts to analyse in small online teams. The texts can be textbooks, children’ s stories, newspapers, ads. The aim of this s task is to encourage students to actively work towards critical awareness of social issues. To help achieve this, students analyse the different ways in which notions of citizenship are socially manipulated (e.g. fairy tales for small children that promote national identities, etc.). The students are asked to try to take on ‘ contrastive’ views by responding to the texts in ‘ roles’ .

We are all newcomers

This task sequence is designed for average to high level language learners (B2 minimum) studying cross-curricular social sciences and languages, with a focus on intercultural aspects of society. It aims to help students debunk myths and stereo-types associated with citizenship rights and immigration. The project helps students compare and contrast the immigration process in different countries and to come to an understanding of what it means to ‘ become a citizen’ (versus being born into ‘ full’ citizenship rights). It begins with a frame-work made up of different levels of learning. At this stage, the students have already worked together on small tasks and know each other (see task database for ideas on getting to know each other if students are new to the exchange).


Level 1 –
information gathering

Level 2 –
looking at the perspectives of the ‘ other’

Level 3 –
acting on this new knowledge and understanding for social action





How to become a citizen

This task is part of a larger task sequence aimed at exploring cross-disciplinary subjects of social sciences, language and intercultural awareness.


Information Gathering:


Students in different countries are required to explore policies and practices involved in becoming a citizen (from non-national resident status, not &#39 birthright&#39 citizen) and contribute to the general knowledge-building of the collaborating classes concerning these processes. Students are required to use ‘ social science research approaches’ in order to discover who are the non-nationals coming to their country what are their reasons for coming and what is the process they go through to become legalized residents.